How To Cite A Law In Chicago7 min read

When you need to cite a law in Chicago, you will need to use a specific format. The following guide will show you how to properly cite a law in Chicago.

In-Text Citation

When citing a law in Chicago, you will need to include the name of the law, the chapter number, and the section number. For example:

The law governing landlord-tenant disputes is found in Chapter 7 of the Municipal Code of Chicago.

(Municipal Code of Chicago 7-12-010)

Reference List

In your reference list, you will need to list the name of the law, the chapter number, the section number, and the year the law was passed. For example:

Municipal Code of Chicago. (7th ed.). Chicago, IL: City of Chicago.

Chapter 7, Section 12,010 of the Municipal Code of Chicago was passed in 2018.

How do you cite a law in writing?

If you are writing about a law, you will need to cite the law in your writing. There are a few different ways to do this, depending on what type of law you are citing.

If you are citing a statute, you will need to include the name of the state and the year the law was passed. You can find this information in the law’s title or in the section called “enacted by.” Here is an example:

State of Maine, 2017

If you are citing a case, you will need to include the name of the case, the year it was decided, and the appellate court that heard the case. Here is an example:

Brown v. Board of Education, 1954

United States Supreme Court

How do you cite British law in Chicago style?

When writing about British law in a Chicago style paper, there are a few things to keep in mind. In order to cite a case from the British court system, you will need to include the name of the case, the year it was decided, the court that decided it, and the volume and page number of the case. You can find this information in most law databases.

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For example, if you were writing about the case of R (on the application of Lord) v. Secretary of State for the Home Department, you would cite it as:

R (on the application of Lord) v. Secretary of State for the Home Department, [2004] EWCA Civ 385, [2004] 2 All ER 967.

If you were citing a statute from the British Parliament, you would include the name of the statute, the year it was passed, and the volume and page number of the statute. For example, the British Human Rights Act of 1998 would be cited as:

Human Rights Act 1998, c. 42, § 1(1).

When citing a secondary source, such as a book or article about British law, you would include the author’s name, the title of the book or article, the year it was published, and the page number. For example, if you were citing an article by John Smith called “The British Constitution: A Historical Overview,” you would cite it as:

John Smith, “The British Constitution: A Historical Overview,” British Journal of Political Science (2000): 123-45.

How do you cite a law in court?

When you’re in court and need to reference a law, you’ll need to cite it in a certain way. This helps to ensure that everyone is on the same page and that the law is being applied correctly. Here’s how to cite a law in court.

The first thing you need to do is find the section of the law that you want to reference. Once you have that, you’ll need to include the title of the law, the year it was passed, and the section that you’re referencing. Here’s an example:

The Constitution of the United States of America, 1789, Article III, Section 2.

You can also cite a law by using the official abbreviations for the state and the year. Here’s an example:

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CA Civil Code, 2003, Section 1717.

If you’re citing a law that’s been amended, you’ll need to include the year that the amendment was passed as well. Here’s an example:

US Constitution, 1789, Amendment XIV, Section 1.

When you’re citing a law in court, it’s important to be as accurate as possible. Make sure to double-check the information that you have to avoid any confusion.

How do you cite a law journal in Chicago style?

The Chicago Manual of Style (CMS) is a guide for writers, editors, and publishers that covers many aspects of document preparation, from manuscript preparation to publication and distribution. The CMS includes guidance on how to cite a law journal in Chicago style.

When citing a law journal in CMS, the author’s name, the title of the journal, the volume number, the issue number, and the year of publication should all be included in the citation. For example:

1. David G. Epstein, The Role of the Federal Courts in Enforcing State Law, 67 Fordham L. Rev. 9 (1998).

2. Epstein, supra note 1, at 9.

3. Epstein, supra note 1, at 9-10.

How do you cite a public law?

How do you cite a public law?

Public laws are the statutes and regulations enacted by the various levels of government in the United States. The most common way to cite public law is to use the United States Code (U.S.C.), the official compilation of the federal statutes, as well as the Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), the official compilation of the regulations of executive agencies.

When citing a public law, you must include the name of the law, the year it was enacted, and the section or article of the law. For example, the cite for the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) would be:

Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, 42 U.S.C. § 12101 et seq.

The cite for the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1985 (COBRA) would be:

Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1985, 29 U.S.C. § 1161 et seq.

The official U.S.C. and C.F.R. sources can be found on the United States Congress and United States Government Printing Office websites, respectively.

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How do you cite a state law?

When you need to cite a state law, there are a few things you’ll need to know. Each state has its own system for citing laws, so you’ll need to find the specific format for your state. In addition, state laws can be found in a variety of places, so you’ll need to know where to look.

The best place to start is the state’s official website. Most states have a section on their website dedicated to statutes, which is where you’ll find the state’s laws. In addition, many states have a searchable online database of statutes.

If you can’t find the statute you’re looking for on the state’s website, you can try searching Google or Westlaw. Westlaw is a subscription-based legal research database that includes all state and federal statutes.

Once you have the statute you need, you’ll need to know the specific format for citing it. Every state has its own rules, so you’ll need to consult the appropriate authority. Generally, the format will include the name of the statute, the section number, and the year it was enacted. Here’s an example of how to cite a state statute:

“The Statute of Frauds, section 2-201, 2009”

How do you cite in Chicago style?

Chicago style is a citation style that is used primarily in the humanities. It is often used in research papers and academic journals. Chicago style is a variation of the Modern Language Association (MLA) style.

In Chicago style, citations are listed in parentheses after the information that is being cited. The citation includes the author’s name, the title of the work, and the year of publication.

For example, if you are citing a book, the citation would look like this: (Smith, John. The Book of Books. 2016).

If you are citing a website, the citation would look like this: (website name. website date).

If you are citing a journal article, the citation would look like this: (Smith, John. “Article Title.” Journal Name, vol. #, no. #, date. Pages).