How To Cite American Jurisprudence6 min read

When you are writing a legal paper, you may need to cite American Jurisprudence. American Jurisprudence is a legal resource that includes cases, statutes, and other legal information. There are different ways to cite American Jurisprudence, depending on what you are citing.

If you are citing a case, you will need to include the name of the case, the volume of American Jurisprudence in which the case is located, and the page number. For example, if you are citing Roe v. Wade, you would include “Roe v. Wade, 410 U.S. 113 (1973).”

If you are citing a statute, you will need to include the name of the statute, the volume of American Jurisprudence in which the statute is located, and the page number. For example, if you are citing the Sherman Antitrust Act, you would include “Sherman Antitrust Act, 15 U.S.C. § 1 (1982).”

If you are citing other legal information, you will need to include the name of the source, the volume of American Jurisprudence in which the source is located, and the page number. For example, if you are citing the Restatement of Contracts, you would include “Restatement of Contracts, §§ 1-2 (1932).”

When you are citing American Jurisprudence, be sure to use the most recent edition. The most recent edition is available online through Westlaw.

How do you cite jurisprudence?

How do you cite jurisprudence?

When citing jurisprudence in your work, you should include the name of the author, the title of the work, the edition, the place of publication, and the date of publication. You should also include the page number(s) where the information you are citing can be found.

Here is an example of how to cite jurisprudence:

Read also  How York City Law Got Hacked

Smith, John. “The Right to a Trial by Jury.” In The Constitution of the United States. Edited by James Wilson. 8th edition. New York: Oxford University Press, 2011. Pp. 234-248.

In-text citation: (Smith 234-248)

How do you Bluebook cite jurisprudence?

Bluebooking is the citation style preferred by many legal professionals in the United States. When citing jurisprudence, there are a few specific things to keep in mind.

The Bluebook citation for a U.S. Supreme Court case is:

Supreme Court of the United States. Year. Name of case. Volume. Page number.

For example, Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas, 347 U.S. 483 (1954).

If there is a volume and page number for the court opinion, you must include them in your citation. If the case is from a state or lower federal court, the Bluebook citation is:

Name of court. Year. Name of case. Volume. Page number.

For example, United States District Court for the District of Columbia. 2009. John Doe v. Jane Roe. 1. 12.

If the case is from an appellate court, you only need to include the year and the name of the court.

For example, United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. 2010. John Doe v. Jane Roe. 9th Cir. 

If the case is from a state supreme court, you only need to include the year and the name of the state.

For example, California Supreme Court. 2010. John Doe v. Jane Roe. 

If you are citing a law review article, the Bluebook citation is:

Name of author. Year. “Title of article.” Name of law review. Volume. Page number.

For example, Smith, John. 2010. “The Abortion Debate: A New Perspective.” Harvard Law Review. 123.

If you are citing a book, the Bluebook citation is:

Name of author. Year. Title of book. Edition. Publisher.

For example, Black, Hugo L. 1962. The Warren Court and the Pursuit of Justice. 1st ed. Random House.

How do you cite American law?

When you are writing a paper and need to cite a law from the United States, there is a specific format that you need to follow.

Read also  Is A Governor Mandate A Law

The first thing you need to do is find the official citation for the law. This can be done by looking on the website of the United States Congress or by searching for it in a legal database like Westlaw or LexisNexis.

Once you have the official citation, you need to include it in your paper in the following format:

Name of the Law

Year it was enacted

Volume number

Page number

For example, the official citation for the United States Constitution is:

The Constitution of the United States

1787

Vol. 1

P. 5

When citing a law in your paper, you would include it in the following format:

United States Constitution

1787

Vol. 1

P. 5

How do you cite a legal secondary source?

When citing a legal secondary source, it is important to include the name of the author, the title of the source, the year it was published, and the page number.

For example, if you were citing a case, you would include the name of the case, the year it was decided, and the page number.

If you were citing a book, you would include the author’s name, the title of the book, the year it was published, and the page number.

If you were citing a law review article, you would include the name of the author, the title of the article, the year it published, and the page number.

If you were citing a statute, you would include the name of the statute, the year it was enacted, and the section number.

If you were citing a regulation, you would include the name of the regulation, the year it was published, and the section number.

It is important to note that legal secondary sources may vary in their formatting, so always check the specific source you are using for the correct citation format.

How do you cite a law in APA 7th edition in text?

There are specific formatting guidelines for citing laws in APA 7th edition style. In text, the full name of the law should be italicized and the year of publication should be included in parentheses. For example: (Smith v. Jones, 2014). If the law is a statute, the statute number should also be included in parentheses. For example: (Public Law 112-1, 2012). If the law is a case, the full case name should be italicized and the year of the decision should be included in parentheses. For example: (Smith v. Jones, 2014). For more information, please consult the APA Publication Manual 7th edition.

Read also  How M1 Ultra Chip Moore Law

How do you cite a law case in APA 7?

The American Psychological Association (APA) Style Guide provides guidance on how to cite law cases in APA 7th edition format.

When citing a law case, include the following information:

1. The full name of the case

2. The year the case was decided

3. The court that decided the case

4. The volume and page number of the case

Here is an example of how to cite a law case in APA 7th edition format:

United States v. Nixon, 418 U.S. 683 (1974).

Supreme Court of the United States.

How do you cite Texas jurisprudence?

When citing Texas jurisprudence in your legal writing, you should include the official name of the case, the year it was decided, the court that decided it, and the docket number. You should also include the official reporter in which the case is published.

For example, if you were citing the case of In re Marriage of J.B. and H.B., decided by the Texas Court of Appeals in 1992, you would cite it as follows:

In re Marriage of J.B. and H.B., 812 S.W.2d 519 (Tex. App. 1992).

The case would be published in the Texas Reports, so you would also include the volume and page number:

In re Marriage of J.B. and H.B., 812 S.W.2d 519 (Tex. App. 1992). Tex. R. App. P. 47.4.