How To Cite The Rome Statute5 min read

How To Cite The Rome Statute

The Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court (ICC) is a multilateral treaty that establishes the ICC, a permanent international tribunal to prosecute individuals for genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes, and the crime of aggression.

To cite the Rome Statute in APA Style, include the following information:

Author(s). (Date). Title of treaty [Rome Statute]. Retrieved from URL

For example:

International Criminal Court. (2002). Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court. Retrieved from http://www.icc-cpi.int/en/romestatute/

How do you cite the Roman Statute?

How do you cite the Roman Statute?

There is no one definitive answer to this question. The best way to cite the Roman Statute will vary depending on the context in which you are using it and the style guide you are following. However, there are some general principles that can be helpful in citing this document.

When citing the Roman Statute, it is important to include the full name of the document, as well as the year it was published. You should also include the section number or article number, if applicable. In addition, you may want to include the official website of the United Nations (www.un.org) where the document is published.

Here is an example of how to cite the Roman Statute:

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United Nations. Roman Statute of the International Criminal Court. 1998. www.un.org/law/icc/statute/romefra.htm.

What is the article of Rome Statute?

The Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court (ICC) is the treaty that established the ICC. The treaty entered into force on July 1, 2002, and currently has 122 States Parties.

The Rome Statute establishes the Court’s jurisdiction over four core international crimes: genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes, and the crime of aggression. The Court may also exercise jurisdiction over any other crime within the jurisdiction of States Parties if they so choose.

The Rome Statute also provides the Court with a number of important procedural protections, including the principle of complementarity and the presumption of innocence.

The Court is able to prosecute individuals for the commission of these crimes, regardless of their nationality or the place where the crime was committed.

Is the Rome Statute a UN treaty?

The Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court (ICC) is an international treaty that establishes the ICC, a permanent international court that prosecutes individuals for the most serious crimes of international concern, such as genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes.

The Rome Statute is not a UN treaty. It was adopted by a conference of states in Rome, Italy, in 1998, and came into force in 2002. The ICC is based in The Hague, the Netherlands.

The Rome Statute is an important part of the international system of justice. It establishes a mechanism to hold individuals accountable for the most serious crimes of international concern.

What does Article 21 of the Rome Statute say and imply?

Article 21 of the Rome Statute sets out the conditions under which the International Criminal Court may exercise its jurisdiction. It states that the Court may prosecute individuals for the most serious crimes of international concern, namely genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes, and the crime of aggression.

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The article also specifies that the Court’s jurisdiction may only be exercised if the accused person is a national of a state that has ratified the Rome Statute, or if the crimes were allegedly committed on the territory of a state that has ratified the Rome Statute. Additionally, the Court may only prosecute crimes that were committed after the Rome Statute entered into force.

What is Article 28 Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court?

Article 28 of the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court (ICC) prohibits the transfer of a person to a country where there are substantial grounds for believing that the person would be in danger of being subjected to torture.

The article is based on the principle of non-refoulement, which holds that no person should be returned to a country where they would be at risk of being tortured or subjected to other forms of ill-treatment.

The provision is designed to ensure that people are not transferred to countries where they could be at risk of torture or other forms of ill-treatment, and that they are not subjected to the death penalty or other forms of punishment or treatment that violate the prohibition on torture.

The article also states that the transfer of a person to a country where they would be at risk of torture must be authorized by the ICC Pre-Trial Chamber.

In order to be transferred to a country where they would be at risk of torture, a person must be subject to an arrest warrant or order from the ICC.

When was the Rome Statute adopted?

On 17 July 1998, the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court was adopted by a large majority of states attending the United Nations Diplomatic Conference of Plenipotentiaries on the Establishment of an International Criminal Court. The statute entered into force on 1 July 2002, after the 60th ratification.

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The Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court is a treaty that establishes the International Criminal Court (ICC), an international tribunal that prosecutes individuals for genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes, and aggression. The treaty was negotiated during the 1990s, and it entered into force on 1 July 2002, after the 60th ratification.

As of October 2017, the ICC has 124 member states. The United States is not a member, although it has signed the treaty. 

The ICC is a permanent court that tries individuals for the most serious crimes of international concern. These crimes are genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes, and aggression. The ICC can only prosecute crimes that took place after the Rome Statute entered into force on 1 July 2002.

The ICC is based in The Hague, in the Netherlands.

What is Article 8 of Rome Statute?

Article 8 of the Rome Statute sets forth the crimes against humanity that may be prosecuted before the International Criminal Court. These crimes include genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes, and the crime of aggression.