How To Determine Rate Law From Elementary Steps8 min read

Rate laws are mathematical relationships between the concentrations of reactants and the rate of reaction. They can be determined experimentally by measuring the rate of reaction at different concentrations of reactants. The rate law can then be used to calculate the reaction rate at any concentration.

There are three steps to determining a rate law from experimental data. First, the data must be analyzed to identify the order of the reaction with respect to each reactant. Second, the data must be used to calculate the rate constant for the reaction. Third, the rate law can be determined from the rate constant and the order of the reaction.

The order of a reaction with respect to a reactant is the power to which the concentration of the reactant appears in the rate law. The order of a reaction can be determined experimentally by measuring the rate of reaction at different concentrations of the reactant. The order is positive if the concentration of the reactant increases the rate of reaction and negative if the concentration of the reactant decreases the rate of reaction.

The rate constant for a reaction is a measure of the speed of the reaction. It can be determined experimentally by measuring the rate of reaction at different temperatures. The rate constant is temperature-independent and has the units of reciprocal time (s-1).

The rate law for a reaction can be determined from the rate constant and the order of the reaction. The rate law is a mathematical relationship between the concentrations of reactants and the rate of reaction. It can be written in the form:

rate = k[A]x[B]y

where k is the rate constant, [A] and [B] are the concentrations of reactants A and B, and x and y are the orders of reaction with respect to reactants A and B, respectively.

How do you determine the rate determining step from elementary steps?

A rate determining step is the slowest step in a chemical reaction. Determining the rate determining step is important in order to control the reaction rate. The rate determining step is usually the unimolecular or bimolecular step.

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Unimolecular reactions involve a single molecule. In these reactions, the rate-determining step is the collision of the reactant molecule with the active site of the enzyme. The collision causes the molecule to break apart and form the product.

Bimolecular reactions involve two molecules. In these reactions, the rate-determining step is the collision of the two molecules. The collision causes the two molecules to react and form the product.

What are the steps in determining the rate law?

The rate of a chemical reaction is determined by the rate law, which is the equation that relates the reaction rate to the concentrations of the reactants. To determine the rate law, you need to know the order of the reaction and the dependence of the reaction rate on the concentration of each reactant.

The order of a reaction is the number of molecules of a reactant that are involved in the reaction. The order of a reaction can be determined by plotting the reaction rate against the concentration of a reactant and fitting a line to the data. The slope of the line is the order of the reaction.

The dependence of the reaction rate on the concentration of a reactant is called the rate coefficient. The rate coefficient can be determined by plotting the reaction rate against the square of the concentration of a reactant and fitting a line to the data. The slope of the line is the rate coefficient.

Once you know the order of the reaction and the rate coefficient for each reactant, you can determine the rate law for the reaction. The rate law is the equation that relates the reaction rate to the concentrations of the reactants.

How do you find the rate law using multiple steps?

Rate laws are important in chemistry because they allow chemists to understand how chemical reactions proceed. There are a variety of ways to find the rate law for a particular reaction, and one of these is through the use of multiple steps.

The first step is to identify the order of the reaction. This can be done by looking at the slope of the reaction plot on a graph. The next step is to determine the rate constant for the reaction. This can be done through experimentation. The final step is to use the rate law to calculate the reaction rate.

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It is important to note that the rate law can change over time, so it is important to periodically re-evaluate the reaction rate. Additionally, different rate laws may be applicable to different parts of the reaction. By using multiple steps, chemists can get a more accurate understanding of how a reaction proceeds.

How do you find the rate law from fast and slow steps?

Rate laws describe how the reaction rate changes as the reactant concentration changes. There are several methods for determining the rate law, but the most common is to compare the reaction rates in fast and slow steps.

In order to determine the rate law, you need to first identify the fast and slow steps. The fast steps are the steps that occur at the beginning of the reaction and the slow steps are the steps that occur at the end of the reaction. The rate law is determined by comparing the reaction rates in the fast and slow steps.

The most common way to compare the reaction rates is to use the slope of the line on a graph of the reaction rate versus concentration. The slope of the line in the fast step is used to determine the rate law for the fast step, and the slope of the line in the slow step is used to determine the rate law for the slow step.

Once you have determined the rate law for the fast and slow steps, you can combine them to get the rate law for the entire reaction. The rate law for the entire reaction is the sum of the rate laws for the fast and slow steps.

What is the rate law for the following elementary reaction?

The rate law for an elementary reaction is the mathematical formula that describes how the reaction rate changes as the reactant concentrations change. The rate law can be used to predict the reaction rate for a given set of reactant concentrations.

The rate law for an elementary reaction is typically expressed in terms of the reaction order and the rate constant. The reaction order is a measure of how the reaction rate depends on the concentration of the reactants. The rate constant is a measure of the reaction rate at a given concentration of the reactants.

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The rate law for the following elementary reaction is expressed in terms of the reaction order and the rate constant.

A + B -> products

The reaction order is zero, and the rate constant is K.

Why is the slow step the rate determining step?

In many chemical reactions, the rate at which a reaction takes place is determined by the slowest step in the reaction. This is known as the rate-determining step. The reason the slow step is the rate-determining step is because it is the step that limits the overall reaction rate.

In some cases, the slow step is the step in which the reactants first come into contact with each other. In other cases, the slow step is the step in which the products are first formed. In either case, the slow step is the step that determines the overall reaction rate.

There are several factors that can affect the rate-determining step. The most important factor is the concentration of the reactants. The higher the concentration of reactants, the faster the reaction will take place.

The temperature of the reactants can also affect the rate-determining step. The higher the temperature, the faster the reaction will take place.

The presence of a catalyst can also speed up the reaction. A catalyst is a substance that can speed up the reaction without being consumed in the reaction.

The type of reactants can also affect the rate-determining step. For example, if the reactants are gases, the reaction will take place faster than if the reactants are liquids.

The rate-determining step is an important factor in determining the overall reaction rate. By understanding the factors that affect the rate-determining step, you can control the reaction rate by adjusting the concentration of the reactants, the temperature, the presence of a catalyst, or the type of reactants.

What are the rate laws for these elementary steps Step 1 NO2 g NO2 G → NO3 G No G Step 2 NO3 g CO G → NO2 g co2 g?

Rate laws are mathematical relationships between the rate of a chemical reaction and the concentrations of the reactants. The rate law for a particular reaction can be determined experimentally.

The rate law for the elementary step Step 1 NO2 g NO2 G → NO3 G No G is

Rate = k[NO2]2

The rate law for the elementary step Step 2 NO3 g CO G → NO2 g co2 g is

Rate = k[NO3][CO]