I Am Not Come To Destroy The Law10 min read

The phrase “I am not come to destroy the law” is found in the Gospel of Matthew. In context, Jesus is speaking to the Pharisees, who were upset because Jesus was teaching people that they did not need to follow the law to be saved.

Jesus responds to the Pharisees by saying, “I am not come to destroy the law, but to fulfil it.” This phrase has been interpreted in different ways over the centuries.

Some people interpret it to mean that Jesus did not come to abolish the law, but to fulfill it. This interpretation is based on the idea that Jesus is the Messiah, and that the Messiah was prophesied to fulfill the law.

Others interpret it to mean that Jesus came to show people that the law could be fulfilled through love and compassion, not just through following the rules. This interpretation is based on the idea that Jesus showed us a new way to follow the law, through love and compassion instead of through rules and regulations.

Both of these interpretations are valid, and they can both be true at the same time. Jesus did come to fulfill the law, and he also showed us a new way to follow the law, through love and compassion.

Where is the Bible does it say I did not come to abolish the law?

There are a few places in the Bible where it says that Jesus did not come to abolish the law. One example is in Matthew 5:17-18, where Jesus says, “Do not think that I have come to abolish the Law or the Prophets; I have not come to abolish them but to fulfill them. For truly I tell you, until heaven and earth disappear, not the smallest letter, not the least stroke of a pen, will by any means disappear from the Law until everything is accomplished.”

This quote from Jesus shows that he did not come to abolish the law, but to fulfill it. He came to show people how to follow the law perfectly. In Romans 3:31, it says, “Do we, then, nullify the law by this faith? Not at all! Rather, we uphold the law.” This verse shows that even though people can be saved by faith in Jesus, they still need to follow the law.

There are other verses in the Bible that talk about Jesus not coming to abolish the law. In Galatians 3:24, it says, “The law was our guardian until Christ came; it protected us until we could be justified by faith.” And in James 2:12, it says, “Speak and act as those who are going to be judged by the law that gives freedom.”

So, what does all this mean? It means that Jesus did not come to abolish the law, but to fulfill it. He came to show people how to follow the law perfectly. We still need to follow the law, even though we can be saved by faith in Jesus.

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Did Jesus come to destroy the law?

The question of whether or not Jesus came to destroy the law is one that has been debated by theologians and scholars for centuries. There are those who believe that Jesus came to fulfill the law, and that he did not come to destroy it. And there are those who believe that Jesus did come to destroy the law, and that his purpose was to usher in a new era of grace and forgiveness.

The Bible does not provide a clear answer as to whether or not Jesus came to destroy the law. However, there are a few scriptures that may shed some light on this question. In Matthew 5:17, Jesus says, “Do not think that I have come to abolish the Law or the Prophets; I have not come to abolish them but to fulfill them.” This scripture seems to indicate that Jesus did not come to abolish the law, but to fulfill it.

However, there are also scriptures that suggest that Jesus did come to destroy the law. In Matthew 7:13-14, Jesus says, “Enter through the narrow gate. For wide is the gate and broad is the road that leads to destruction, and many enter through it. But small is the gate and narrow the road that leads to life, and only a few find it.” This scripture seems to suggest that the way to destruction is by following the broad path that leads away from God, while the way to life is through the narrow path that leads to God. And in Romans 7:6, Paul says, “But now, by dying to what once bound us, we have been released from the law so that we serve in the new way of the Spirit, and not in the old way of the written code.” This scripture suggests that, through Jesus, we have been released from the law.

So, what is the answer? Did Jesus come to destroy the law, or did he come to fulfill it?

There is no easy answer to this question. It is likely that Jesus came to do both. He came to fulfill the law, and he also came to destroy it. The law was meant to be a guide for humanity, but it was never meant to be followed perfectly. Jesus came to show us that we can’t follow the law perfectly, and that we need to rely on his grace and forgiveness.

What did Jesus say about the law?

What did Jesus say about the law?

The Bible says that Jesus came to fulfill the law, not to abolish it (Matthew 5:17). This means that Jesus upheld the law and taught people how to obey it correctly.

For example, Jesus said that the most important commandment is to love God with all your heart, mind, and soul (Matthew 22:37-38). He also said that we should love our neighbors as ourselves (Matthew 22:39).

Jesus showed us that the law is important, but it’s not the most important thing. We should obey the law because we love God, and we want to please Him.

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What do Matthew 5 17 mean?

When Jesus famously said “Do not think that I have come to abolish the Law or the Prophets; I have not come to abolish them but to fulfill them. For truly, I say to you, until heaven and earth pass away, not an iota, not a dot, will pass from the Law until all is accomplished.” (Matthew 5:17-18), what did he mean?

Some people interpret this to mean that Jesus considered the Old Testament Law to be binding and unchangeable. Others say that Jesus was simply emphasizing the importance of the Law, and that he didn’t necessarily see it as unchangeable.

It’s important to remember that Jesus was a Jew, and that he lived and taught within the context of first-century Judaism. The Old Testament Law was an important part of Jewish culture and religious life. So it’s not surprising that Jesus would emphasize the importance of the Law.

At the same time, Jesus also showed that he was capable of going beyond the letter of the Law. For example, he showed that mercy and love are more important than strict adherence to the Law. (See, for example, the story of the Good Samaritan.)

So, what do Matthew 5:17-18 mean? It’s difficult to say for certain. But it seems that Jesus was emphasizing the importance of the Old Testament Law, while also indicating that he was going beyond it in important ways.

Where does Jesus say I am the law?

Where does Jesus say I am the law?

There is no one definitive answer to this question. In various places throughout the New Testament, Jesus refers to Himself as the law. For example, in John 14:15, Jesus says, “If you love me, you will keep my commandments.” In John 10:18, He says, “No one takes my life from me, but I lay it down of my own accord. I have power to lay it down, and I have power to take it up again. This command I received from my Father.” In Romans 7:12, Paul writes, “So then, the law is holy, and the commandment is holy, righteous and good.”

In each of these cases, Jesus is claiming to be the ultimate authority on the law. He is the one who establishes it, upholds it, and defines its meaning. This is in line with the Jewish belief that God Himself is the ultimate lawgiver. When Jesus speaks of Himself as the law, He is claiming to be equal with God.

There are also places in the New Testament where Jesus speaks of the law in a negative sense. For example, in Matthew 5:17-19, Jesus says, “Do not think that I have come to abolish the Law or the Prophets; I have not come to abolish them but to fulfill them. I tell you the truth, until heaven and earth disappear, not the smallest letter, not the least stroke of a pen, will by any means disappear from the Law until everything is accomplished. Anyone who breaks one of the least of these commandments and teaches others to do the same will be called least in the kingdom of heaven, but whoever practices and teaches these commands will be called great in the kingdom of heaven.”

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In this passage, Jesus is emphasizing the importance of obeying the law. He is not doing away with it, but instead is emphasizing that it is still important to follow God’s commandments.

What does Paul say about the law?

What does Paul say about the law?

In the book of Romans, Paul extensively discusses the role of the law in the life of a Christian. He makes it clear that the law is not irrelevant for believers, but that it has been fulfilled in Christ.

For Paul, the essence of the law is not about obeying rules, but about living in relationship with God. The law shows us our need for a Savior, and it points us to Christ. Christ is the true fulfillment of the law, and through Him we can receive forgiveness and eternal life.

For Paul, the law is not a way to earn salvation, but rather a guide to show us the way to Christ. It is through faith in Christ that we receive salvation, not through our own efforts.

The law still has an important role in the life of a Christian. It can help us to understand our sin and to develop a closer relationship with God. But it is no longer the primary means of salvation. That is something that is only possible through faith in Christ.

What did Jesus say about keeping the commandments?

There are many commandments given in the Bible, but what did Jesus say specifically about keeping them?

In the Gospel of Matthew, Jesus said, “Think not that I am come to destroy the law, or the prophets: I am not come to destroy, but to fulfil. For verily I say unto you, Till heaven and earth pass, one jot or one tittle shall in no wise pass from the law, till all be fulfilled. Whosoever therefore shall break one of these least commandments, and shall teach men so, he shall be called the least in the kingdom of heaven: but whosoever shall do and teach them, the same shall be called great in the kingdom of heaven” (5:17-19).

In other words, Jesus said that we should obey the commandments and that they will not change until heaven and earth pass away. He also said that those who teach others to disobey the commandments will be called the least in the kingdom of heaven, while those who obey and teach them will be called great in the kingdom of heaven.

Jesus also said, “If you love me, keep my commandments” (John 14:15). This shows that Jesus loves us and wants us to obey Him by keeping His commandments.

The Bible also says, “For this is the love of God, that we keep his commandments: and his commandments are not grievous” (1 John 5:3). This verse tells us that obeying God’s commandments is an act of love.

Overall, it is clear that Jesus wants us to obey His commandments and that doing so is a sign of love for Him.