I Did Not Come To Abolish The Law8 min read

I Did Not Come To Abolish The Law

Recently, a quote from Martin Luther King Jr. has been making the rounds on social media. The quote reads, “I did not come to abolish the law but to fulfill it.” This quote has been used to suggest that King was in support of the law and believed that it should be followed.

While it is true that King did believe in following the law, he also believed in working to change laws that were unjust. For example, King was a leader in the civil rights movement, which aimed to end segregation and racial discrimination. He believed that the law was not just and needed to be changed.

King’s quote is often misinterpreted. He did not come to abolish the law, but he did come to change it so that it was just and fair for all people.

What does abolish the law mean?

There is no one definitive answer to this question. Abolishing the law can mean different things in different contexts. In some cases, it may simply mean repealing a law that is no longer needed or relevant. In other cases, it may involve a more fundamental challenge to the very concept of law itself.

One of the key debates around the concept of law is the question of its legitimacy. Some people argue that law is necessary to ensure order and stability in society, while others claim that law is nothing more than a tool of oppression used by the powerful to control the masses.

Abolishing the law can be seen as a way of rejecting the legitimacy of law and challenging the status quo. It can be seen as a way of asserting the power of the individual over the dictates of the state.

However, it is important to note that abolishing the law is not a simple or easy process. It can be a risky and dangerous undertaking, and it is not always clear what might happen if law is abolished.

There is a risk that without law, society would descend into chaos and violence. There is also a danger that without law, the powerful would be free to abuse and exploit the weak without consequence.

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Thus, abolishing the law is a complex and risky undertaking, and it should not be undertaken lightly. It should only be done after careful consideration of the risks and benefits involved.

What did Jesus say about the old law?

What did Jesus say about the old law?

When asked about the old law, Jesus said, “Do not think that I came to destroy the Law or the Prophets. I did not come to destroy but to fulfill.” (Matthew 5:17)

Jesus believed that the old law was still important. He said that not one letter of the law would disappear until heaven and earth passed away. (Matthew 5:18)

However, Jesus also taught that the old law was only a shadow of the good things that were to come. (Hebrews 10:1)

Jesus showed us that the old law was only a temporary measure, until the true fulfilment came through Him.

What do Matthew 5 17 mean?

What do Matthew 5:17 mean?

The passage from the Gospel of Matthew that is quoted above is often referred to as the “Golden Rule.” It is a principle that is found in many religious and ethical teachings around the world. The principle is that we should treat others as we would want to be treated.

There are a few different ways to interpret this passage. One way is to interpret it as a commandment from God. Another way is to interpret it as a principle that we should follow in order to live a good life.

Many people see the Golden Rule as a way to promote peace and harmony in the world. It is a way to remind us that we should always try to think about how we would want to be treated if we were in the other person’s shoes.

The Golden Rule is a good principle to follow because it can help us to be more understanding and compassionate towards others. It can also help us to avoid conflict and to build relationships that are based on mutual respect.

Where does Jesus say I am the law?

There are numerous places in the Bible where Jesus discusses the law. In one particular verse, Jesus says “I am the law.” (John 10:34) This can be interpreted in a few different ways.

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First, Jesus could be saying that He is the one who establishes the law. In other words, Jesus is the one who sets the standards for how people should live their lives. He is the one who sets the rules and expectations.

Second, Jesus could be saying that He is the one who upholds the law. In other words, Jesus is the one who ensures that the law is followed and that people are held accountable for their actions.

Third, Jesus could be saying that He is the one who fulfills the law. In other words, Jesus is the one who makes it possible for people to obey the law and receive God’s blessing.

Ultimately, Jesus is all of these things. He is the one who establishes the law, upholds the law, and fulfills the law. He is the one who sets the standard for how we should live our lives, and He is the one who makes it possible for us to receive God’s blessing.

Did Jesus come to abolish the law?

Did Jesus come to abolish the law? This is a question that has been asked throughout history, with people on both sides of the argument. There are those who believe that Jesus came to abolish the law, and those who believe that Jesus came to fulfill the law. So, what did Jesus actually say about this topic?

First, it is important to understand what the law is. The law is a set of guidelines that God gave to the Israelites to help them live lives that please Him. These guidelines include things like the Ten Commandments, which teach us how to live in harmony with God and others. The law is not about earning God’s favor or trying to be good enough to deserve His love. It is about living in a way that honors Him.

So, did Jesus come to abolish the law? The answer is no. Jesus came to fulfill the law. This means that He came to make it possible for us to obey the law and please God. Jesus Himself said, “Do not think that I have come to abolish the Law or the Prophets; I have not come to abolish them but to fulfill them” (Matthew 5:17).

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Jesus did not come to do away with the law, but to show us how to obey it perfectly. He paid the penalty for our sin, so that we could be forgiven and have eternal life. Now, we can come to God through Jesus, and receive His forgiveness and grace. We don’t have to try to earn God’s favor by obeying the law perfectly; that is something that Jesus has already done for us.

So, what does this mean for us today? It means that we can come to Jesus, and trust Him to help us obey the law. We don’t have to be perfect, but we do need to be willing to follow Jesus’ example and let Him guide us. As we do this, we will find that the law becomes easier to obey, and that we can experience true freedom and joy in our lives.

How do you use abolish in a sentence?

Abolish is a verb meaning to end the existence of something. It can be used in a sentence to talk about abolishing an organization, a law, or a tradition. For example, “The president called for the abolition of the death penalty.”

Do the 10 commandments still apply?

Do the Ten Commandments still apply? This is a question debated by many people, both religious and non-religious alike. The Ten Commandments are a set of moral laws that were given to Moses by God on Mount Sinai. They are listed in the Bible in Exodus 20:1-17.

Many people believe that the Ten Commandments still apply today. They argue that the commandments were given by God and are therefore binding on all people. They also argue that the commandments reflect God’s will for human behavior and that they provide a framework for a good, moral life.

Others believe that the Ten Commandments are no longer applicable today. They argue that the commandments were specific to the ancient Israelites and that they are not relevant in today’s society. They also argue that the commandments are not binding on all people, only on those who follow the Jewish or Christian faiths.

There is no easy answer to this question. Each person must decide for themselves what they believe. However, it is worth considering the arguments for and against the Ten Commandments.