Independent Counsel Law Expired9 min read

The Independent Counsel Law, which was enacted in 1978, expired on Sunday, June 30, 2019. This law allowed for the appointment of a special prosecutor to investigate certain high-level federal crimes.

The law was initially enacted in response to the Watergate scandal, and it allowed for the appointment of a special prosecutor to investigate crimes committed by the president or other high-level government officials. The law was later amended in 1994 to allow for the appointment of a special prosecutor to investigate any federal crime.

The expiration of the Independent Counsel Law means that no special prosecutor can now be appointed to investigate any federal crime. This could potentially lead to a lack of accountability for high-level government officials who commit crimes.

Critics of the Independent Counsel Law argue that it is unnecessary, since the Department of Justice can already investigate crimes committed by high-level officials. Supporters of the law argue that the Department of Justice is often too closely aligned with the President to be impartial, and that a special prosecutor is needed to ensure a fair and impartial investigation.

The expiration of the Independent Counsel Law is likely to lead to a debate about its merits and whether it should be reinstated.

What was the independent counsel Act?

The independent counsel Act (ICA) is a law passed by the United States Congress in 1978 that allows for the appointment of an “independent counsel” to investigate and, if warranted, prosecute government officials for violations of federal law. The law was introduced in response to the Watergate scandal, and was designed to provide a measure of independence to investigations of high-level government officials.

The ICA was repealed in 1999, after being found unconstitutional by the US Supreme Court. However, in 1983, the Court ruled that the law was constitutional, and it remained in effect until its repeal.

The ICA provided for the appointment of an “independent counsel” to investigate and, if warranted, prosecute government officials for violations of federal law. The counsel was appointed by a special three-judge panel, and was not subject to the authority of the Attorney General or the President.

The ICA was introduced in response to the Watergate scandal, and was designed to provide a measure of independence to investigations of high-level government officials. However, the law was found to be unconstitutional by the US Supreme Court in 1999, and it was repealed.

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How many special counsel’s have there been?

Since the Watergate scandal, the appointment of special counsels has become a common tool for the Department of Justice to investigate potential wrongdoing by high-ranking government officials. How many special counsels have been appointed in the past?

According to the Congressional Research Service, there have been at least nine special counsels appointed since Watergate. The first was in 1978, when Attorney General Griffin Bell appointed a special prosecutor to investigate the failed assassination attempt on President Jimmy Carter. The most recent was in May 2017, when Robert Mueller was appointed to investigate potential collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia.

There have been a number of high-profile special counsel investigations over the years, including the Iran-Contra affair, the Whitewater scandal, and the Monica Lewinsky affair. While some of these investigations led to criminal convictions, others ended in acquittals or were otherwise unsuccessful.

The appointment of a special prosecutor can be a politically divisive issue, particularly when the target of the investigation is a high-ranking government official. In some cases, the special prosecutor has been accused of overreach or of conducting a partisan witch hunt.

The appointment of a special prosecutor is generally a decision made by the attorney general, with the approval of the president. However, the appointment of Robert Mueller as special counsel in the Russia investigation was made by Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, after Attorney General Jeff Sessions recused himself from the case.

What is the president’s executive privilege?

Executive privilege is the right of the president of the United States to withhold information from Congress or any other government body. This privilege is derived from the president’s role as head of the executive branch of the federal government. The purpose of executive privilege is to protect the president’s ability to carry out his or her duties without interference from Congress or the courts.

The first time executive privilege was explicitly mentioned in the Constitution was in the 1807 case of United States v. Burr, in which the Supreme Court ruled that President Thomas Jefferson did not have to turn over documents to Congress related to the Burr conspiracy. In the case of United States v. Nixon, the Supreme Court ruled that President Richard Nixon could not use executive privilege to withhold tapes and documents from the Watergate investigation.

Since the Nixon case, the scope of executive privilege has been debated by the courts and scholars. There is no single definition of executive privilege, and it has been applied in different ways in different cases. Generally, executive privilege applies to documents and communications that are related to the president’s official duties and are not available to the public.

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Executive privilege can be invoked by the president himself or by the executive branch. The president can direct the executive branch to refuse to comply with a subpoena or other request for information. If the executive branch refuses to comply, the matter can be taken to court.

Executive privilege is not absolute. It can be overcome by a showing of need for the information by Congress or the courts. In addition, executive privilege can be waived by the president.

Executive privilege is a controversial issue, and there is no consensus about its proper scope or application. Critics argue that executive privilege is a tool that can be used to shield the president from accountability. Supporters argue that executive privilege is necessary to protect the president’s ability to carry out his or her duties.

What law created the Office of Special Counsel?

The Office of Special Counsel (OSC) is an independent federal investigative and prosecutorial agency. It was created in 1978 by the Ethics in Government Act, which was passed in the wake of the Watergate scandal. The OSC is charged with investigating and prosecuting violations of federal law by federal employees, including violations of the Hatch Act, which prohibits partisan political activity by federal employees. The OSC also oversees the administration of the Hatch Act by the Office of the Special Counsel, which is responsible for providing guidance and education to federal employees on the restrictions of the Hatch Act.

Who controls special counsel?

The special counsel appointed to lead the investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election, Robert Mueller, is under the direct control of Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein.

Rosenstein, who was appointed as deputy attorney general by President Trump in April, has the authority to fire Mueller and to decide what charges the special counsel can pursue.

Trump has said that he would not have appointed Rosenstein if he had known he would give Mueller such broad authority.

Mueller was appointed as special counsel in May after Attorney General Jeff Sessions recused himself from the Russia investigation.

The special counsel is appointed by the attorney general, or in this case the deputy attorney general, to investigate potential crimes.

The appointment of Mueller was welcomed by both Republicans and Democrats, who praised his reputation for independence and impartiality.

Rosenstein has said that he will not fire Mueller without good cause, and that he has seen no evidence of good cause so far.

Mueller is also investigating possible collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia, as well as any other crimes that may have been committed.

So far, no evidence of collusion has been found.

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Trump has repeatedly denied any collusion between his campaign and Russia, and has called the investigation a “witch hunt.”

The special counsel is also investigating whether Trump attempted to obstruct the investigation by firing FBI Director James Comey.

Trump has denied that he tried to obstruct the investigation, and has said that he fired Comey because he was doing a bad job.

Who runs the Office of Special Counsel?

The Office of Special Counsel (OSC) is an independent federal investigative and prosecutorial agency. It is headed by a Special Counsel, who is appointed by the President and confirmed by the Senate.

The Special Counsel is charged with investigating and prosecuting federal crimes, including violations of the Hatch Act. The Hatch Act prohibits federal employees from engaging in partisan political activity.

The OSC is a small agency with a staff of about 170 employees. The Special Counsel is the only presidential appointee in the agency.

The OSC is a separate agency from the Department of Justice. The Department of Justice is responsible for investigating and prosecuting federal crimes, including violations of the Hatch Act.

The OSC is not part of the executive branch of the federal government. The executive branch is headed by the President. The OSC is an independent agency within the judicial branch of the federal government. The judicial branch is headed by the Supreme Court.

The OSC is a relatively small agency. It has a staff of about 170 employees. The Special Counsel is the only presidential appointee in the agency.

The OSC is an independent agency within the judicial branch of the federal government. The judicial branch is headed by the Supreme Court.

What does the twenty second amendment do?

The Twenty-second Amendment to the United States Constitution is a part of the United States Constitution. It limits the number of times a person can be elected president. The amendment was ratified on February 27, 1951.

The Twenty-second Amendment states:

“No person shall be elected to the office of the President more than twice, and no person who has held the office of President, or acted as President, for more than two years of a term to which some other person was elected President shall be elected to the office of President more than once. But this Article shall not apply to any person holding the office of President when this Article was ratified.”

The Twenty-second Amendment was ratified on February 27, 1951. The amendment was proposed on January 10, 1947, and ratified by the states on February 27, 1951. The amendment was proposed in response to Franklin D. Roosevelt being elected to a fourth term as president.