Justice Black Opinion Pentagon Papers6 min read

Justice Black Opinion Pentagon Papers

On June 17, 1971, The New York Times published a series of articles based on a secret study of the Vietnam War that had been commissioned by the US Department of Defense. The so-called Pentagon Papers were a damning indictment of the US government’s handling of the war, and the Nixon administration was not happy. The Justice Department quickly filed a lawsuit against the Times and its publisher, Arthur Sulzberger, seeking to block further publication of the papers.

The Times went to court to fight the government’s efforts to suppress the report, and the case eventually reached the US Supreme Court. In a landmark ruling, the Court sided with the Times, holding that the First Amendment protected the right of the press to publish information of public interest, even if that information was obtained illegally.

The Pentagon Papers case was a major victory for the First Amendment and for the press, and it helped to establish the principle of freedom of the press as a cornerstone of American democracy.

What was the basis of Justice Black’s opinion?

Justice Hugo Black’s opinion in the seminal case of Brown v. Board of Education was based on the idea of “the equal protection of the laws.” This means that all people in the United States are to be treated equally under the law, regardless of race. This principle is enshrined in the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution.

Justice Black’s opinion was based on the idea that, as stated in the Constitution, all people are created equal. This means that, regardless of race, all people are to be treated the same by the government. This principle is the bedrock of American democracy, and Justice Black was a staunch defender of it.

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What did the Supreme Court say with the Pentagon Papers?

In 1971, the New York Times published a series of articles entitled “The Pentagon Papers” which revealed confidential information about the Vietnam War. The Pentagon Papers were a series of top-secret documents compiled by the Department of Defense which detailed the history of the United States’ involvement in the Vietnam War.

The Nixon administration attempted to block the publication of the Pentagon Papers, arguing that they constituted a national security threat. In 1971, the United States Supreme Court ruled in favor of the New York Times, stating that the First Amendment protected the right to publish the Pentagon Papers.

What was the decision in the Pentagon Papers case?

The Pentagon Papers case was a landmark United States Supreme Court case in which the court ruled that the government could not prevent the New York Times and Washington Post from publishing classified information about the Vietnam War.

The case began in 1971, when the New York Times published a series of articles based on a leaked top-secret government study of the Vietnam War. The study, which was known as the Pentagon Papers, revealed that the United States had misled the public about its involvement in the Vietnam War.

The government quickly tried to stop the New York Times from publishing any more articles based on the Pentagon Papers, and it filed a lawsuit against the newspaper. The case eventually made its way to the United States Supreme Court, which ruled in favor of the New York Times in a 6-3 decision.

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What information did the Pentagon Papers disclose?

The Pentagon Papers were a top-secret Pentagon study on the Vietnam War that was leaked to the media in 1971. The papers revealed that the United States had been secretly arming and funding the Vietnam War for years, and that the government had lied to the public about the progress of the war. The papers also revealed that the United States had been spying on its own citizens, and that the government had been manipulating the media to spread false information about the war. The Pentagon Papers caused a nationwide uproar and led to several congressional investigations into the Vietnam War.

How did Justice Black differ from the majority opinion?

Justice Hugo Black was one of the nine justices who voted in the majority in the United States Supreme Court case of Korematsu v. United States, which upheld the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II. However, Justice Black later came to regret his decision, and he publicly dissented from the majority opinion in a later case, Hirabayashi v. United States, which overturned Korematsu.

In the Korematsu case, the majority opinion was written by Justice Hugo Black. The opinion upheld the decision of the United States government to intern Japanese Americans during World War II, based on the argument that they could be dangerous to national security. However, in later years, Justice Black came to regret his decision, and he publicly dissented from the majority opinion in the Hirabayashi case, which overturned the Korematsu decision.

In his dissent in the Hirabayashi case, Justice Black argued that the decision to intern Japanese Americans was based on racism, and that it violated the constitutional rights of those who were interned. He argued that the government had not provided any evidence that Japanese Americans were actually a threat to national security, and that the decision to intern them was based purely on racial prejudice.

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Justice Black’s dissent in the Hirabayashi case was influential, and it helped to set the stage for the eventual overturning of the Korematsu decision.

What is Justice Hugo Black’s views on freedom of speech?

Justice Hugo Black was a champion of the First Amendment and believed in the freedom of speech. He argued that the amendment protected not only the spoken word, but also the printed word. He believed that the amendment protected unpopular speech as well as popular speech.

Justice Black believed that the amendment protected freedom of speech not only for the speaker, but also for the listener. He believed that the amendment protected the right of the listener to hear all sides of an issue, even if the listener disagreed with the speaker.

Justice Black was a strong advocate of the free press. He believed that the press should be free to report on all aspects of the news, even if the news was unfavorable to the government.

Justice Black was a strong believer in the First Amendment and believed that it should be extended to all forms of communication. He was a strong advocate of the freedom of speech and the freedom of the press.

Who leaked the Vietnam papers?

The Vietnam papers were leaked to the public in 1971. The leak exposed the true extent of the United States’ involvement in the Vietnam War.

The leak was orchestrated by Daniel Ellsberg, a former Defense Department employee. Ellsberg had become disillusioned with the United States’ involvement in the Vietnam War and decided to leak the papers to the public.

The leak caused a public outcry and led to increased opposition to the Vietnam War. It also led to the prosecution of Ellsberg, who was eventually acquitted.