Indian Labour Law Working Hours7 min read

The Labour Laws in India specify the working hours for employees. The Factories Act of 1948 prescribes an eight-hour working day or 48 hours per week, whichever is higher. The law also requires a break of 30 minutes after every four hours of work. The Mines Act of 1952 specifies an eight-hour working day and a 42-hour week for underground workers. Overtime is allowed but must not exceed three hours in a day or 12 hours in a week.

The Shops and Establishments Act of 1958 regulates the working hours in shops and commercial establishments. It specifies an eight-hour working day or 48 hours per week, whichever is higher. It also requires a break of 30 minutes after every five hours of work. Overtime is allowed but must not exceed two hours in a day or eight hours in a week.

The Plantations Labour Act of 1951 regulates the working hours of workers in plantations. The law specifies an eight-hour working day or 48 hours per week, whichever is higher. Overtime is allowed but must not exceed three hours in a day or 12 hours in a week.

The Child Labour (Prohibition and Regulation) Act of 1986 prohibits the employment of children below the age of 14 years in any factory, mine, or plantation. The law also prohibits the employment of children below the age of 18 years in any other kind of work.

How many hours are you legally allowed to work in a day in India?

In India, the maximum number of hours that an employee can be asked to work in a day is 9. This is specified in the Factories Act, 1948. The Act applies to factories, commercial establishments, and other work places.

Employees working in factories are not allowed to work for more than 8 hours in a day, or 48 hours in a week. If they work for more than 8 hours in a day, they are entitled to 1 hour of rest. The rest must be given in the middle of the working day, and it cannot be divided into two parts.

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Employees working in commercial establishments are not allowed to work for more than 10 hours in a day, or 60 hours in a week. If they work for more than 10 hours in a day, they are entitled to 2 hours of rest. The rest must be given in the middle of the working day, and it cannot be divided into two parts.

Employees working in other work places are not allowed to work for more than 8 hours in a day, or 48 hours in a week. If they work for more than 8 hours in a day, they are entitled to 1 hour of rest. The rest must be given in the middle of the working day, and it cannot be divided into two parts.

Employees are also allowed a break for meals. The break should be for at least 30 minutes, and it should be given after 6 hours of work.

Employees who work for more than 9 hours in a day, or for more than 48 hours in a week, are not allowed to work for more than 3 hours in a day, or for more than 18 hours in a week. These employees are also entitled to a break for meals. The break should be for at least 30 minutes, and it should be given after 6 hours of work.

Employees who work for more than 9 hours in a day, or for more than 48 hours in a week, are not allowed to work for more than 3 hours in a day, or for more than 18 hours in a week. These employees are also entitled to a break for meals. The break should be for at least 30 minutes, and it should be given after 6 hours of work.

Employees who work for more than 9 hours in a day, or for more than 48 hours in a week, are not allowed to work for more than 3 hours in a day, or for more than 18 hours in a week. These employees are also entitled to a break for meals. The break should be for at least 30 minutes, and it should be given after 6 hours of work.

Are 12 hour shifts legal in India?

Are 12 hour shifts legal in India?

There is no specific law in India that prohibits 12 hour shifts. However, the Factories Act, 1948, which regulates the working hours of employees in factories, stipulates that the maximum working hours for an adult employee is nine hours a day. The act also requires that an employee be given a break of one hour after working for five hours.

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It is therefore advisable to check with the labour department in the state where the company is registered to find out if it is legal to have employees work for 12 hours a day.

Is 7 days working allowed in India?

Yes, 7 days working is allowed in India. The Labour Laws in India allow an employee to work for 7 days a week, subject to the employer’s agreement. 

There are some restrictions, though. An employee cannot work for more than 9 hours a day and 48 hours a week. Overtime is allowed, but it must be paid at a higher rate. 

The Labour Laws also require that an employee be given at least 1 day off every week. This day off can be in addition to the weekend.

Is lunch break included in working hours in India?

In India, the lunch break is not considered to be part of the working hours. This means that employees are not required to take a break for lunch and can continue to work during this time. However, many companies do offer their employees a lunch break, typically for an hour or two.

What is India’s overtime rule?

What is India’s overtime rule?

The overtime rule in India states that employees are entitled to overtime pay if they work more than 48 hours in a week. The overtime pay must be equivalent to at least one and a half times the employee’s regular rate of pay.

The overtime rule applies to employees in both the private and public sectors. It also applies to both manual and non-manual workers.

The overtime rule does not apply to employees who are covered by a collective bargaining agreement that provides for overtime pay at a higher rate.

Employers must keep records of the hours worked by their employees. These records must be kept for at least two years.

What is the new Labour law in India?

In the year 2019, the Labour law in India has undergone a few changes. The most notable change is the amendment to the Industrial Disputes Act, 1947. This amendment allows businesses with up to 300 employees to lay off workers without government permission.

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The amendment also allows businesses to close down without government permission, as long as they pay their workers their due wages and compensation. Additionally, the amendment stipulates that businesses must give workers three months’ notice before retrenching them.

The amendment has been criticised by labour unions, who argue that it gives businesses too much freedom to lay off workers and close down without any consequences. They argue that this will lead to a loss of jobs, and that the government should have instead focused on creating more jobs.

The government has defended the amendment, arguing that it will help businesses to be more competitive and create more jobs. It has also said that the amendment contains provisions for workers’ welfare, such as the provision of notice period and compensation.

Is working 12 hours a day legal?

There is no definitive answer to this question as the legality of working 12 hours a day will depend on the specific laws and regulations of the country or state in question. However, in general, it is legal to work 12 hours a day in most countries, as long as the employee is given adequate rest periods and is not working excessive hours overall.

In the United States, for example, the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) does not set a limit on the number of hours that an employee can work per day, but employees are entitled to a minimum of one day off per week, and employers must pay employees overtime rates for hours worked in excess of 40 per week.

Similarly, the Working Time Regulations in the United Kingdom state that employees can work up to 48 hours per week, but they must receive at least 11 consecutive hours of uninterrupted rest per day. Employees who work more than 48 hours per week are entitled to a paid break of at least 20 minutes every day.

It is important to note that these are just a few examples, and that the legality of working 12 hours a day can vary from country to country. If you are unsure about the regulations in your area, it is best to speak to an employment lawyer or labor union representative.